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The Linux Kernel Prepares For Rust 1.77 Upgrade

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader shared this post from Phoronix: With Linux 6.8 the kernel's Rust code was brought up to Rust 1.75 while new patches posted this weekend port the code over to Rust 1.76 and then the upcoming Rust 1.77... With Rust 1.77 they have now stabilized the single-field "offset_of" feature used by the kernel's Rust code. Rust 1.77 also adds a "--check-cfg" option that the Rust kernel code will likely transition to in the future. This follows the Rust for Linux policy of tracking the upstream Rust version upgrades until there is a minimum version that can be declared where all used features are considered stable.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Linux Becomes a CVE Numbering Authority (Like Curl and Python). Is This a Turning Point?

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From a blog post by Greg Kroah-Hartman: As was recently announced, the Linux kernel project has been accepted as a CVE Numbering Authority (CNA) for vulnerabilities found in Linux. This is a trend, of more open source projects taking over the haphazard assignments of CVEs against their project by becoming a CNA so that no other group can assign CVEs without their involvment. Here's the curl project doing much the same thing for the same reasons. I'd like to point out the great work that the Python project has done in supporting this effort, and the OpenSSF project also encouraging it and providing documentation and help for open source projects to accomplish this. I'd also like to thank the cve.org group and board as they all made the application process very smooth for us and provided loads of help in making this all possible. As many of you all know, I have talked a lot about CVEs in the past, and yes, I think the system overall is broken in many ways, but this change is a way for us to take more responsibility for this, and hopefully make the process better over time. It's also work that it looks like all open source projects might be mandated to do with the recent rules and laws being enacted in different parts of the world, so having this in place with the kernel will allow us to notify all sorts of different CNA-like organizations if needed in the future. Kroah-Hartman links to his post on the kernel mailing list for "more details about how this is all going to work for the kernel." [D]ue to the layer at which the Linux kernel is in a system, almost any bug might be exploitable to compromise the security of the kernel, but the possibility of exploitation is often not evident when the bug is fixed. Because of this, the CVE assignment team are overly cautious and assign CVE numbers to any bugfix that they identify. This explains the seemingly large number of CVEs that are issued by the Linux kernel team... No CVEs will be assigned for unfixed security issues in the Linux kernel, assignment will only happen after a fix is available as it can be properly tracked that way by the git commit id of the original fix. No CVEs will be assigned for any issue found in a version of the kernel that is not currently being actively supported by the Stable/LTS kernel team. alanw (Slashdot reader #1,822) worries this could overwhelm the CVE infrastructure, pointing to an ongoing discussion at LWN.net. But reached for a comment, Greg Kroah-Hartman thinks there's been a misunderstanding. He told Slashdot that the CVE group "explicitly asked for this as part of our application... so if they are comfortable with it, why is no one else?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

OpenZFS Native Encryption Use Has New(ish) Data Corruption Bug

Slashdot -

Some ZFS news from Phoronix this week. "At the end of last year OpenZFS 2.2.2 was released to fix a rare but nasty data corruption issue, but it turns out there are other data corruption bug(s) still lurking in the OpenZFS file-system codebase." A Phoronix reader wrote in today about an OpenZFS data corruption bug when employing native encryption and making use of send/recv support. Making use of zfs send on an encrypted dataset can cause one or more snapshots to report errors. OpenZFS data corruption issues in this area have apparently been known for years. Since May 2021 there's been this open issue around ZFS corruption related to snapshots on post-2.0 OpenZFS. That issue remains open. A new ticket has been opened for OpenZFS as well in proposing to add warnings against using ZFS native encryption and the send/receive support in production environments. jd (Slashdot reader #1,658) spotted the news — and adds a positive note. "Bugs, old and new, are being catalogued and addressed much more quickly now that core development is done under Linux, even though it is not mainstreamed in the kernel."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Asahi Linux Project's OpenGL Support On Apple Silicon Officially Surpasses Apple's

Slashdot -

Andrew Cunningham reports via Ars Technica: For around three years now, the team of independent developers behind the Asahi Linux project has worked to support Linux on Apple Silicon Macs, despite Apple's total lack of involvement. Over the years, the project has gone from a "highly unstable experiment" to a "surprisingly functional and usable desktop operating system." Even Linus Torvalds has used it to run Linux on Apple's hardware. The team has been steadily improving its open source, standards-conformant GPU driver for the M1 and M2 since releasing them in December 2022, and today, the team crossed an important symbolic milestone: The Asahi driver's support for the OpenGL and OpenGL ES graphics have officially passed what Apple offers in macOS. The team's latest graphics driver fully conforms with OpenGL version 4.6 and OpenGL ES version 3.2, the most recent version of either API. Apple's support in macOS tops out at OpenGL 4.1, announced in July 2010. Developer Alyssa Rosenzweig wrote a detailed blog post that announced the new driver, which had to pass "over 100,000 tests" to be deemed officially conformant. The team achieved this milestone despite the fact that Apple's GPUs don't support some features that would have made implementing these APIs more straightforward. "Regrettably, the M1 doesn't map well to any graphics standard newer than OpenGL ES 3.1," writes Rosenzweig. "While Vulkan makes some of these features optional, the missing features are required to layer DirectX and OpenGL on top. No existing solution on M1 gets past the OpenGL 4.1 feature set... Without hardware support, new features need new tricks. Geometry shaders, tessellation, and transform feedback become compute shaders. Cull distance becomes a transformed interpolated value. Clip control becomes a vertex shader epilogue. The list goes on." Now that the Asahi GPU driver supports the latest OpenGL and OpenGL ES standards -- released in 2017 and 2015, respectively -- the work turns to supporting the low-overhead Vulkan API on Apple's hardware. Vulkan support in macOS is limited to translation layers like MoltenVK, which translates Vulkan API calls to Metal ones that the hardware and OS can understand. [...] Rosenzweig's blog post didn't give any specific updates on Vulkan except to say that the team was "well on the road" to supporting it. In addition to supporting native Linux apps, supporting more graphics APIs in Asahi will allow the operating system to take better advantage of software like Valve's Proton, which already has a few games written for x86-based Windows PCs running on Arm-based Apple hardware.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Damn Small Linux' is Back - But Bigger

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Back in 2006 Slashdot reported on a 50-megabyte "micro" distro called Damn Small Linux. (And in 2012 we wrote that it "rose from the dead" with a new release candidate.) Now Damn Small Linux has been reborn again, according to its developer's web site: Creating the original DSL, a versatile 50MB distribution, was a lot of fun and one of the things I am most proud of as a personal accomplishment. However, as a concept, it was in the right place at the right time, and the computer industry has changed a lot since then. While it would be possible to make a bootable Xwindows 50MB distribution today, it would be missing many drivers and have only a handful of very rudimentary applications. People would find such a distribution a fun toy or something to build upon, but it would not be usable for the average computer user out of the gate.... The new goal of DSL is to pack as much usable desktop distribution into an image small enough to fit on a single CD, or a hard limit of 700MB. This project is meant to service older computers and have them continue to be useful far into the future. Such a notion sits well with my values. I think of this project as my way of keeping otherwise usable hardware out of landfills. As with most things in the GNU/Linux community, this project continues to stand on the shoulders of giants. I am just one guy without a CS degree, so for now, this project is based on antiX 23 i386... a fantastic distribution that I think shares much of the same spirit as the original DSL project. AntiX shares pedigree with MEPIS and also leans heavily on the geniuses at Debian. The blog It's FOSS News describes it as "a unique experience in a sea of Debian-based and Fedora-based distros." It is offered with two window managers, Fluxbox and JWM, with apt being fully enabled by default for easy package installations... At the time of writing, only the Alpha ISOs were made available on the official downloads page. It is only a matter of time before we get a stable release.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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